the journey of words's avatar

the journey of words

fables-of-the-reconstruction
When it’s cold and raining,
you are more beautiful.

And the snow brings me
even closer to your lips.

The inner secret, that which was never born,
you are that freshness, and I am with you now.

I can’t explain the goings,
or the comings. You enter suddenly,

and I am nowhere again.
Inside the majesty.

— Rumi, “The Freshness,” The Essential Rumi, New Expanded Edition. HarperOne, 2004

Yumna diary, The most alien-looking place on Earth. November, 2013.

Yumna diary, The most alien-looking place on Earth. November, 2013.

grandhotelabyss
I imagined I needed no one, and this is what I still imagine to this day. I needed no one, and so I had no one. But naturally we do need someone, otherwise we inevitably become what I have become: tiresome, unbearable, sick—impossible, in the profoundest sense of the word. I always believed that I could get on with my intellectual work if only I were left completely alone, with no one else around. This proved to be mistaken, but it is equally mistaken to say that we actually need someone. We need someone for our work, and we also need no one. Sometimes we need someone, sometimes no one, and sometimes we need someone and no one. In the last few days I have once more become aware of this totally absurd fact: we never know at any time whether we need someone or no one, or whether we need someone and at the same time no one, and because we never ever know what we really need we are unhappy, and hence unable to start on our intellectual work when we wish and when it seems right.

— Thomas Bernhard, Concrete (trans. David McLintock). Interlink Publishing Group, 1990

(via christinasvdp)

When in the end, the day came on which I was going away, I learned the strange learning that things can happen which we ourselves cannot possibly imagine, either beforehand, or at the time when they are taking place, or afterwards when we look back on them.

― Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen), Out of Africa. Modern Library, 1937

Perhaps he knew, as I did not, that the Earth was made round so that we would not see too far down the road.

― Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen), Out of Africa. Modern Library, 1937

Have You Got A Story For Me?

 ”Have You Got A Story For Me?” by John Barry [Out Of Africa, 1985]

I’m not allowed to need you. Or rely on you, or expect anything from you. I’m free to leave. But I do need you.
[…] I have learned a thing that you haven’t. There are some things worth having…but they come at a price, and I want to be one of them.

— Meryl Streep as Karen Blixen in Out Of Africa (1985) directed by Sydney Pollack

I’ve got this little thing that I’ve learned to do lately. When it gets so bad and I think I can’t go on, I try to make it worse. And when I’m certain that I can’t stand it… I go one moment more. And then I know I can bear anything.

— Meryl Streep as Karen Blixen in Out Of Africa (1985) directed by Sydney Pollack

monochromanic
Robert Redford and Meryl Streep in Out Of Africa (1985) directed by Sydney Pollack

Robert Redford and Meryl Streep in Out Of Africa (1985) directed by Sydney Pollack

(via monochromanic)

foshizzlemovies
It’s an odd feeling, farewell. There is such envy in it. Men go off to be tested, for courage. And if we’re tested at all, it’s for patience, for doing without, for how well we can endure loneliness.

— Meryl Streep as Karen Blixen in Out Of Africa (1985) directed by Sydney Pollack